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 Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?

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PostSubject: Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?    Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?  Icon_minitimeWed Aug 10, 2016 10:38 am

Or on a larger scale, mass violence in general?
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Sections from Fried Magazine that can explain it better than me:

"Hypermasculinity is the idealization and embodiment of very stereotypically macho and masculine traits, and the simultaneous rejection and contempt for all things that resemble feminine traits. These stereotypically masculine traits include virility, high-status, power, strength, and aggressiveness — while the stereotypically feminine traits include compassion, weakness, and expressions of emotions."

"When boys are shamed into rejecting “feminine” traits within themselves — such as vulnerability, sadness, and compassion — their emotions are manifested in 'acceptable,' 'masculine' ways, such as anger, aggressiveness, and disengagement. This predisposes boys to retaliate against any questioning of their manhood in the “acceptable” violent or aggressive manner. In addition, those who are predisposed to mental illness are much less likely to seek out help for fear of being perceived as less of a man or too emotional. Father figures, the media, and sports and military cultures are highly influential, and are often seen as responsible for constructing the definition of what it means to be a 'real' man. Unfortunately, social constructions of masculinity very frequently glorify the violent and hypermasculine."

"However, upon exploring the statements and profiles of a number of well known perpetrators of mass murder, including...Eric Harris (one of the Columbine shooters), some very obvious patterns emerge. These patterns include perceptions of sexual and social rejection by women and masculine peers, obsession with violence and weaponry, desires to dominate and destroy, a lack of emotional empathy for victims, and ambition to assert and prove manhood."
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I think we can all agree that Eric and Dylan felt that they had trouble fitting into the mold expected of successful, teenage boys, and thus felt rejected. Personally, I also think that the massacre was their way of asserting power in a fashion exemplified in American society is "manly." There are several articles and academic studies out there on the internet that go into more detail, but I'm surprised more people don't talk about it. I searched around on here for something on the topic, but was unable to find any discussion.

There are some articles suggesting that Omar Mateen, the Orlando night club shooter, was also facing his own manhood crisis, which may have led to the attack. What I am interested in mostly is how hypermasculinity played a part in Columbine. Any thoughts would be appreciated!
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Lizpuff

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PostSubject: Re: Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?    Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?  Icon_minitimeWed Aug 10, 2016 2:35 pm

I think I recall reading something like this on another thread but I also cannot find it. I think it could be plausible.

The issue is obviously there are a ton of mental issues that are similar. I do think they wanted to seem tougher and more masculine during NBK though

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PostSubject: Re: Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?    Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?  Icon_minitimeWed Aug 10, 2016 3:13 pm

Lizpuff wrote:
I think I recall reading something like this on another thread but I also cannot find it.  I think it could be plausible.

The issue is obviously there are a ton of mental issues that are similar.  I do think they wanted to seem tougher and more masculine during NBK though

Maybe this thread?
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Article from thread:
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PostSubject: Re: Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?    Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?  Icon_minitimeWed Aug 10, 2016 10:56 pm

I've always said that lack of sex is a huge factor in these things. "Love kills the demon" is almost a mantra in Natueal Born Killers and it's makes sense. These two boys didn't experience love back and therefore it played a huge role in what happened in my opinion.
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Nirvana92

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PostSubject: Re: Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?    Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?  Icon_minitimeWed Aug 10, 2016 11:51 pm

x5000x wrote:
I've always said that lack of sex is a huge factor in these things. "Love kills the demon" is almost a mantra in Natueal Born Killers and it's makes sense. These two boys didn't experience love back and therefore it played a huge role in what happened in my opinion.

While you're right about their lack of sex being a factor, that actually ties into societies view of masculinity as a whole. The media loves to typecast "macho men" as big muscular dudes drowning in consensual sex. Eric and a Dylan didnt fit into that category, and Eric especially wanted nothing more than to be a part of it. The trench coats, the angry glares at their peers, and Erics angry ranting are perfect examples of coping mechanisms the boys set up to deal with their low self esteems. They couldn't match the jocks so instead they dove to the other end of the spectrum. Trecnch coats replaced good looks. Insults replaced suave smooth talking. Guns made up for their lack of personal power. Even though they had different end goals NBK was a way for E/D to feel some amount of masculine power in life.
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PostSubject: Re: Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?    Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?  Icon_minitimeFri Aug 12, 2016 2:14 am

I think all guns give people a sense of power. False power. From a gang banger to even law enforcement. It's just how it is. Not much will ever change.
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PostSubject: Re: Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?    Was Columbine a product of American masculinity?  Icon_minitime

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